How To Water Your Plant

All of your indoor plants need water to survive, but not all plants have the same watering needs. Oddly enough, over-watering is the most common way to kill an indoor plant. As a general rule, with most plants, it’s usually better to underwater than overwater.

Follow these steps to make sure you’re watering your plant properly.

how-to-water-your-plant

Step 1:

Check your plant’s care guide to read up on its specific water needs.

Step 2:

Check the soil. Press your finger in the soil to check if the soil is dry. If the soil is still damp, you don’t need to water your plant yet. If the soil is dry, your plant is ready for watering. For most plants, only water when the soil is dry about an inch or so deep. (How much light the plant is getting, humidity levels, and the season, all affect how quickly the plant drinks up the water, so monitor the soil regularly.)

Step 3:

Remove the plant from its decorative planter. If the plastic pot is difficult to remove, then only water gradually from above, making sure not to overwater.

Step 4:

Water your plant with fresh water.

• When watering moderately: Water the plant lightly and slowly from above, allowing water to soak through to the roots, then tip out any excess water.

• When watering thoroughly: place a saucer or tray underneath the plant and fill it with fresh water. Water generously and evenly from above, then let the plant sit and soak up water from below. After an hour, tip out any excess water from the saucer, as well as from the plastic pot.

Step 5:

Return the plant to its decorative planter.

General Watering Tips

▫ Most houseplants prefer lukewarm/room temperature water rather than cold water.

▫ About every other watering, aerate the soil for even water distribution. Loosen the soil by gently poking a few holes using a chopstick or similar blunt stick—then water as usual.

▫ If you tend to forget to water your plant regularly, try placing a sponge at the bottom of your decorative planter, beneath the plastic pot. The sponge will absorb and hold excess water that your plant can continue to drink when it goes without water.